In The Weeds, 7.8.15: Bug Town

Admittedly a more eye catching title than “Elizabethtown”, “Bug Town” was the nickname for an early Denton County settlement named after Elizabeth Creek which was, in turn, named after John B. Denton’s daughter Elizabeth. In the far southeast corner of the Shamblin Survey you can see a tiny cross indicating the Elizabethtown Cemetery. That plat is located near the intersection of Hwy 114 and I-35W (click on image for larger view):

ShamblinSurveyElizabethtown002

Elizabethtown is one of several Denton County ghost towns and got its nickname from its settlers who hailed from Tennessee who had never seen the number and varieties of insects in that area.

Here is a Google Earth image of the area:

Elizabethtown

In Hollace Hervey’s book “Historic Denton County: An Illustrated History” published by the Denton County Historical Museum, Elizabethtown is said to have been settled by Peters Colonists in 1847 at “the point where the Ranger Trail and the stage route from Ft. Worth to Denton crossed the creek.” Isn’t it interesting to see how closely I-35W has apparently paralleled the old Anglo trail which, in turn, may have followed an Indian trail?

By the late 1870s, the town had several businesses, a post office, saloons, and its own school district. However, the eventual arrival of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad a couple miles to the east in Roanoke sounded the death knell to Elizabethtown. On August 2, 1881 the post office was closed and reopened the next day in Roanoke. The community barely survived into the 20th Century and by the 1940s was little more than the location of a cemetery (seen below). The bugs are probably still there, however.

ghosttowns 024

 

There is an excellent history of the the town and cemetery written by Mrs. I. Neal Samuels and Mrs. A. B. Harmonson located in our vertical files at the Emily Fowler Library, and an article from the Oct. 19, 1966 Denton Record Chronicle available at any DPL location from Newspaper Archives.

Chuck Voellinger

June 26, 2015 at 2:22 pm Leave a comment

Binge This, Not That!

As you progress from being a child to adulthood, you’re given a plethora of information on what you should or should not do. For example, you shouldn’t binge eat. Additionally, the danger of binge drinking is made loud and clear. However, one type of binging is acceptable if not encouraged. Binge- Watching or Binge-Viewing. Indeed, family, friends, critics, columnists, etc. all urge a person to binge-watch television shows they think are worthy. So, far be it from me to not succumb to such pressure and given summer is when folks are supposed to have more free time….

If you are going to binge-watch any show this season, choose True Detective Season One. In the summer, so many movies and television shows are bombastic. This show is for those who enjoy a slow burn. The HBO series spans 17 years and is told through the eyes of two Louisiana State Police Detectives. The Detectives are played by Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson. McConaughey in particular gives an award worthy performance that was overlooked. Shame on you Emmy voters!

Be forewarned, the crimes the two deal with are extremely dark and for mature audiences. However, for adults who don’t mind such themes, the episodes will be a refreshing change of pace compared to most television.

So binge that my library users! True Detective Season 1

Jess Edward Turner

South Branch Library

June 24, 2015 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

New Books in July! Put on hold today.

Dexter BadlandsNaked

 

 

 

 

The following titles are scheduled to be released in July but are available now in the catalog to put on hold.

AFTER THE STORM by Castillo, Linda

THE ANNIHILATION SCORE by Stross, Charles

AURORA by Robinson, Kim Stanley

BABY, YOU’RE THE BEST by Morrison, Mary B.

BADLANDS by Box, C. J.

THE BEST EVER by Evanovich, Stephanie

BOMBS AWAY : THE HOT WAR by Turtledove, Harry

THE BOURBON KINGS by Ward, J. R.

BROKEN PROMISE by Barclay, Linwood

BRUSH BACK by Paretsky, Sara

CODE OF CONDUCT by Thor, Brad

COLD FRAME by Deutermann, Peter T.

THE COLOR OF LIGHT by Richards, Emilie

DANCE OF THE BONES by Jance, Judith A.

DEADLY ELECTION by Davis, Lindsey

DEATH AT DOVECOTE HATCH by Cannell, Dorothy

DEXTER IS DEAD by Lindsay, Jeffry P.

DOWN AMONG THE DEAD MEN by Lovesey, Peter

THE FORGOTTEN by Graham, Heather

GREEN HELL by Bruen, Ken

HALF A WAR by Abercrombie, Joe

HOW TO BE A GROWN-UP by McLaughlin, Emma/ Kraus, Nicola

IF I COULD TURN BACK TIME by Harbison, Beth

LOOKING THROUGH DARKNESS by Thurlo, Aimee/ Thurlo, David

LORD OF THE WINGS by Andrews, Donna

THE NAKED EYE by Johansen, Iris/ Johansen, Roy

NAKED GREED by Woods, Stuart

NEMESIS by Coulter, Catherine

NOONTIME FOLLIES by Gunn, Elizabeth

THE NOVEL HABITS OF HAPPINESS by McCall Smith, Alexander

ONE WAY OR ANOTHER by Adler, Elizabeth

THE OTHER DAUGHTER by Willig, Lauren

PERFECT TOUCH by Lowell, Elizabeth

PRETTY GIRLS by Slaughter, Karin

THE REDEEMERS by Atkins, Ace

REFINING FIRE by Peterson, Tracie

SCENTS AND SENSIBILITY by Quinn, Spencer

SILENT CREED by Kava, Alex

1636 : The CARDINAL VIRTUES by Flint, Eric/ Hunt, Walter H.

SOMEONE ALWAYS KNOWS by Muller, Marcia

SPEAKING IN BONES by Reichs, Kathy

THOSE GIRLS by Stevens, Chevy

TWICE IN A LIFETIME by Garlock, Dorothy

WIRED by Garwood, Julie

WISHES FOR CHRISTMAS by Michaels, Fern

THE WOMAN WHO STOLE MY LIFE by Keyes, Marian

~Kimberly

June 21, 2015 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

New DVDs! Put them on Hold Today.

InsurgentCitizen FourLongest Ride

 

 

 

 

The following DVDs have recently been added to our catalog and are available for holds.

The Age of Adaline

Child 44

Citizenfour

Ex Machina

Get Hard

Home

Insurgent

The Longest Ride

Paul Blart Mall Cop 2

True Story

While We’re Young

Woman in Gold

~Kimberly

 

June 21, 2015 at 8:00 am Leave a comment

Interactive Learning Wall!

South Branch has a new addition in our children’s area. An interactive learning wall made possible in part through a grant from the Denton Benefit League. Children’s Librarian Rebecca Ivey has worked two years to get this wall from idea to fruition. The wall is open for any child to interact with and supports the library’s mission statement of promoting lifelong learning, encouraging human connections and sharing resources. Please stop by during South Branch’s hours of operation and take a look.

Interactive Learning Wall at South Branch Library

Interactive Learning Wall at South Branch Library

 

 

 

 

Jess Edward Turner

South Branch Library

June 17, 2015 at 9:20 am Leave a comment

Teen Fiction ♥s the 80s and the 90s

Are you of a certain age and wish to relive your teenage years through the angst-filled prose of a teen fiction novel?  Do you have teens of your own and wish to give them a glimpse of adolescence sans Twitter, Instagram, and ubiquitous cell phones (can you believe that, at times, we were unreachable and didn’t always have cameras with us)?  Look no further than this list of teen fiction set in the 80s and 90s:

 

Eleanor and ParkEleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell – A first young adult novel by the author of Attachments follows the year-long, star-crossed romance between two 1980s high school misfits whose intelligence tells them that first loves almost never last but whose feelings prevent them from remaining as practical.

Pop Culture References – The Smiths, Misfits, Joy Division, Karate Kid, etc.

 

 

The Future of UsThe Future of Us by Jay Asher – It’s 1996, and less than half of all American high school students have ever used the Internet. Emma just got her first computer and Josh is her best friend. They power up and log on–and discover themselves on Facebook, fifteen years in the future. Everybody wonders what their Destiny will be. Josh and Emma are about to find out.

Pop Culture References – Dave Matthews, Wayne’s World, pagers

 

 

The Perks of Being a WallflowerThe Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky – A rerelease of an acclaimed first novel by the screenplay writer for Rent finds misfit Charlie writing letters to an unidentified recipient that share intimate observations about a high school environment of first dates, relationship dramas and experimentations with sex and drugs.

Pop Culture References – The Smiths, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Smashing Pumpkins, Nirvana

 

 

The Catastrophic History of You and MeThe Catastrophic History of You and Me by Jess Rothenberg – Just before her sixteenth birthday, Brie Eagan literally dies of a broken heart when her boyfriend tells her he does not love her, and she then must go through the five stages of grief, while watching her friends and family try to cope with her death, before her faith in love is restored and she can move on to the afterlife.

Pop Culture References – New Kids on the Block, Disney Princesses, the Bangles

 

 

Scar BoysThe Scar Boys by Len Vlahos – Written as a college admission essay, eighteen-year-old Harry Jones recounts a childhood defined by the hideous scars he hid behind, and how forming a band brought self-confidence, friendship, and his first kiss.

Pop Culture References – Bruce Springsteen, Animal House, Blondie

 

 

The Boy on the BridgeThe Boy on the Bridge by Natalie Standiford – It is 1982 and 19-year-old Laura Reid is spending a semester in Leningrad studying Russian, but when she meets Alyosha she discovers the dissident Russia–a world of wild parties, underground books and music, love and constant danger.

Pop Culture References: Neil Young, “Take This Job and Shove It,” McDonald’s

Supergirl MixtapesSupergirl Mixtapes by Meagan Brothers – Sixteen-year-old Maria leaves her father and grandmother in Red Hill, South Carolina, to live with her mother, an artist who lives with her young boyfriend in a tiny apartment in Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Pop Culture References: Nirvana, Leonard Cohen, Pavement, Michael Stipe, and many more.

-Dana Tucker is the Teen Services Librarian at the North Branch Library and sometimes wishes she were unreachable.  You can reach her at dana.tucker@cityofdenton.com.

June 9, 2015 at 6:10 pm Leave a comment

Every Hero Has a Story

Every year, local libraries create a Summer Reading program for children—and sometimes even for adults! While reading for prizes is fun, is there another purpose?

Many times children will enter the new school year at a lower reading level. Children are not given the opportunity or incentive to read during the summer. Therefore, libraries have created reading programs to encourage children to read during the summer and to prevent this “Summer Slide.”

The first Summer Reading program began in the 1890’s and started as a list of “best reads” for children, and parents were encouraged to bring their children to the library for intellectual stimulation. The idea of reading throughout the summer spread to other libraries, and soon children were recording what they read to share with their friends.

Variations of summer reading programs can now be found at almost every local library, school, and even restaurants and businesses encourage children to read during the summer. Come out to any of our three library locations and sign up your whole family for some Summer Reading fun!

 

~Rebecca

 

The Cleveland children’s library league. (1897, October). Library Journal, Philadelphia Conference, 22(10), 150-153.

The library in vacation days. (1898, July). Library Journal, 23(7), 279.

June 2, 2015 at 3:47 pm Leave a comment

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