Long Nights and Hot Coals

I love summer. Even with the 100 degree days and the mosquitoes, summer is still my favorite season of the year. I think it is the long days, the late onset of darkness, and the cooler nights. I just want to be outside. And, of course, grilling goes hand-in-hand with outside activities.

Here’s a few books in the library for your outdoor cooking culinary inspiration. (Description from the publishers)

Cooking with Texas Highways samples all the major ethnic cuisines of the state with recipes Texas Highwaysfrom home cooks, well-known chefs, and popular restaurants. It offers a varied and intriguing selection of snacks and beverages, breads, soups and salads, main dishes, vegetables and sides, sauces and spreads, desserts, and more. A special feature of this cookbook is a chapter on Dutch-oven cooking, which covers all the basics for cooking outdoors with live coals, including seventeen mouth-watering recipes. In addition, you’ll find dozens of the color photographs that have long made Texas Highways such a feast for the eyes, along with tips on cooking techniques and sources for ingredients and stories about some of the folks who created the recipes.

Texas EatsIn Texas Eats, Walsh covers the standards, from chicken-fried steak to cheese enchiladas to barbecued brisket. He also makes stops in East Texas, for some good old-fashioned soul food; the Hill Country, for German- and Czech-influenced favorites; the Panhandle, for traditional cowboy cooking; and the Gulf Coast, for timeless seafood dishes and lost classics like pickled shrimp.Texas Eats even covers recent trends, like Viet-Texan fusion and Pakistani fajitas. And yes, there are recipes for those beloved-but-obscure gems: King Ranch casserole, parisa, and barbecued crabs. With more than 200 recipes and stunning food photography, Texas Eats brings the richness of Texas food history vibrantly to life and serves up a hearty helping of real Texas flavor.

Part field guide to grilling and barbecuing and part cookbook, Master of the Grill features aMasters of the grill wide variety of kitchen-tested recipes for meat, poultry, seafood, vegetables, pizza, and more. These are the recipes everyone should know how to make— the juiciest burgers, barbecue chicken that’s moist not tough, tender grill-smoked pork ribs, the greatest steak (and grilled potatoes to serve alongside). Regional specialties are included, too—learn how to make Cowboy Steaks, Alabama BBQ Chicken, and Kansas City Sticky Ribs. Colorful photography captures the beauty of the recipes and step-by-step shots guide you through everything you need to know. A section on grilling essentials covers the pros and cons of gas and charcoal grills and which might be right for you, as well as the tools you’ll use with them— such as grill brushes, tongs, vegetable baskets, and wood chips and chunks.

lust for leaf

Lust for Leaf by food-blogging duo Alex Brown and Evan George—better known as Hot Knives—have shown their 60,000 monthly readers that vegetarians are “cheeky [and] over-the-top” too and “don’t much care for established notions of propriety” (LA Weekly). This is the only cookbook you’ll find with chapters called “Bro-tein” and “BBQ Mosh Pit,” or filled with recipes for DIY Wieners and Patties, Sauce-y Explosions, Salsas that Hurt, Deep Sea Mushrooms, and Nachos that Cook Themselves. And don’t forget dessert: try Hand-Cranked Cream Dreams and Booze You Can Eat.

Goodbye Glu

Goodbye Gluten is both a cookbook and shopping guide for people who do not want gluten in their diets and are tired of missing out on their favorite foods. In each recipe the authors use everyday brand names that can be found at your local grocery store, which means you no longer have to check labels to decipher if a product is gluten-free. Another appeal of the book is its use of Texas and Tex-Mex flavors to add a kick to what can be bland fare.

BBQ Bash

Take your backyard barbecue to the next level with BBQ Bash! With 100 creative, delicious recipes for the grill or smoker, this book is the key to partying with a touch of panache. Karen Adler and Judith Fertig present savory, crowd-pleasing recipes for casual get-togethers or “black-tie” barbecues. Chapters are divided into appetizers, entrees, sides and salads, and succulent desserts, and dishes.  The introduction reveals all the information you’ll need to host a memorable bash from start to finish, with tips about charcoal and gas grilling, smoking, skewering, stir-grilling, planking, stovetop smoking, and even stocking the bar, setting the tables, and selecting the right music.

100 best

100 Best Grilling Recipes – Grilling has a special place in cooking traditions worldwide. Whether a Punjabi tikka or a Texas barbecue, grilled dishes provide a unique taste. With recipes drawn from every continent, 100 Best Grilling Recipes offers around-the world tour of different countries and cultures. Also featured are 35 additional recipes for delicious accompaniments, among them Lebanese cucumber and mint salad, and double bourbon barbecue sauce. With a kitchen or backyard grill,100 Best Grilling Recipes provides a sampling of the world’s most delectable grilled dishes along with a tempting array of international accompaniments.

all fired up

 

 

All Fired Up offers grilling advice and barbecue recipes, including citrus-grilled turkey breast, jerk chicken kabobs, and grilled bok choy.
Texas on the table

 

Texas on the Table shares a collection of new and classic Texan recipes, ranging from soups and first courses to meat and vegetarian dinners, complemented by stories of the farmers, cheesemakers, and others who are changing the face of Texas cuisine.

 

Laura Douglas
Senior Librarian
Emily Fowler Central Library

 

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