New Graphic Novels

We just got in a ton of graphic novels from big hitters like Drawn & Quarterly and Fantagraphics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gone to Amerikay

Derek McColloch

“This sweeping, century-spanning graphic novel explores the vivid history of Irish émigrés to New York City via three intertwined tales, from a penniless woman raising a daughter alone in the Five Points slum of 1870, to a struggling young artist drawn to the nascent counterculture of 1960, the year America elected its first Irish-Catholic president.”–Publisher’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journalism

Joe Sacco

“This volume collects most all the shorter reporting pieces I have done over the years for magazines, newspapers, and book anthologies. As such, it seems to call for some sort of introductory fusillade to rout all those who would naysay the legitimacy of comics as an effective means of journalism”– Publisher’s Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvey Pekar’s Cleveland

“One of the very greatest works by that unique and irreplaceable American voice, the truly splendorous Harvey Pekar… graced by the impeccable and poignant artistry of Joseph Remnant.” — From the introduction by Alan Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me

Harvey Pekar

“[T]his posthumous work by Pekar functions as a multipronged exploration of religious, political, and personal histories and is all the richer for it . . . A sweet and simple epilogue by Pekar’s widow, Joyce Brabner, provides the perfect capstone.”
Publishers Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trinity A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb

Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

Trinity illuminates a turning-point in human history, and does so with admirable pace, grace, and skill.” —Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

“Succeeds as both a graphic primer and a philosophical meditation.”
Kirkus (starred review)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Silence of Our Friends

Nate Powell

This semi-autobiographical tale is set in 1968 Texas, against the backdrop of the fight for civil rights. A white family from a notoriously racist neighborhood in the suburbs and a black family from its poorest ward cross Houston’s color line, overcoming humiliation, degradation, and violence to win the freedom of five black college students unjustly charged with the murder of a policeman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tangles; a Story about Alzheimer’s, My Mother and Me

Sarah Leavitt

“What do you do when your outspoken, passionate and quick-witted mother starts fading into a forgetful, fearful woman? In this powerful graphic memoir, Sarah Leavitt reveals how Alzheimer’s disease transformed her mother Midge–and her family forever. In spare black-and-white drawings and clear, candid prose, Sarah shares her family’s journey through a harrowing range of emotions–shock, denial, hope, anger, frustration–all the while learning to cope, and managing to find moments of happiness. Tangles confronts the complexity of Alzheimer’s disease, and gradually opens a knot of moments, memories and dreams to reveal a bond between a mother and a daughter that will never come apart”–P. [4] of cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flannery O’Connor the Cartoons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glitz 2 Go

Diane Noomin

“Diane Noomin has been producing some of the most hysterically funny comics on the market. DiDi Glitz is a shamelessly campy, mai-tai-swilling swinger with a voracious appetite for polyester, poodles and doomed relationships!” (Hypno )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goliath

Tom Gauld

This story reworks the David-and-Goliath myth. Goliath of Gath isn’t much of a fighter. Given half a choice, he would pick administrative work over patrolling in a heartbeat, to say nothing of his distaste for engaging in combat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same Difference

Derek Kirk Kim

A series of short stories in graphic novel format follows a group of friends in their twenties as they navigate young adulthood and relationships.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s